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January 28th, 2019

WWF protect our oceans, rivers, forests, and wildlife. Learn how you can contribute.

type:Donation, NGO, Volunteering
by:Yair Oded

As climate change exacerbates due to human activity and natural resources dwindle, both humans and animals suffer great habitat loss, and a growing number of wildlife species are at risk of extinction.

WWF is a United Kingdom-based independent conservation organization, whose primary goal is to “to create a world where people and wildlife can thrive together.”

Through a global network of members and volunteers, WWF work to encourage people to live sustainably and espouse practices that minimize their impact on the environment.

One of their main methods of operation is to apply pressure on and provide guidance to governments, companies, and organizations, working tirelessly behind the scenes to promote green and sustainable policies that would protect wildlife and natural resources and reduce carbon emissions. Just last year, WWF campaign successfully urged major banks across the UK to implement policies that would safeguard World Heritage sites.

Another successful campaign of WWF is one through which people may ‘adopt’ an endangered animal and thus learn more about the risks it faces as well as of actions taken to protect it.

From forests to oceans to freshwater and frozen environments- WWF maintains a presence across the globe, drawing public attention to conservation crises, educating communities and institutions about ways in which they can contribute, as well as aggressively pushing for sustainable policy reforms in order to mitigate the catastrophic effects of climate change.

VWWF also holds events (such as marathons, for instance) to raise awareness of their cause and help fund-raise.

Please visit their website to learn about ways in which you can contribute: either by attending events, volunteering, fundraising and campaigning for the organization, or donating.

Image credit: Luc Sanchez via Flickr

wwf.org.uk